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3 CRAFTY WAYS TO USE FREEZER PAPER-




Freezer paper has been a kitchen staple for generations. 
Crafters, quilters and hobby enthusiasts are already aware
 that freezer paper has many more uses.
 
The manufacturer brags about the additional uses
RIGHT ON THE BOX!
 
 
Here are 3 crafty ways to use freezer paper-
 
  1. FABRIC TRANSFERS
 
2. CRAFT TEMPLATES
 
     3. IRON-ON TRANSFERS


*Always remember that freezer paper
 has 2 distinct sides to it,
a dull side and a shiny side.

 

   When a HOT iron is applied directly to the shiny side
 it melts in to a glue type substance that will stick
to your iron and make a mess.

If this should happen take another sheet of freezer paper

and fold it in half, the dull side facing out.

Now run your sticky hot iron over the dull side of the freezer paper

until the "gunk" is gone from your iron.

Okay, let's get started!

1. FABRIC TRANSFERS-
Use an 8 1/2"x11" piece of cardstock as a
template and trace it several times on to the dull side
of the freezer paper and cut them out.

  It's always good to make a bunch of templates at one time!

 
Now you'll want to pick a fabric that you want to
adhere the freezer paper to with a HOT DRY iron.
 
Below are a few of the fabric choices I use
all the time and they work GREAT!
 
  
As you can see from the photo below, you'll want to spread
your fabric out on to your ironing board and lay
the freezer paper sheets on top of the fabric, shiny side down.
 
Run a HOT DRY iron back and forth
over the freezer paper until you can see
that it has adhered to your fabric.
 
 
Once you've let the sheets cool down,
all that is left to do is cut the bonded freezer
paper and fabric in to individual pieces of
ready-to-use fabric transfer sheets!
 
 
The fabric transfer sheets are ready
to be used in your inkjet printer!
 
I load one sheet at a time so there is
less chance of them getting jammed.
 

2. CRAFT TEMPLATES
The first thing you'll want to do is make your 8 1/2"x11"
freezer paper templates, following the directions we
outlined in making fabric transfer sheets.
 
Again, it's always easier to make a bunch at a time.
 
Place a sheet of cardstock together with a
sheet of freezer paper, always making certain
that the shiny side is facing towards the cardstock. 
 
 
Take your HOT DRY iron and run it
back and forth over the dull side of the freezer paper
making certain to press down firmly on the corners
and along the sides.
 
The bonded freezer paper and cardstock
 are now ready-to-use craft template sheets. 
  
 
Run your craft template sheet through your inkjet
printer and cut out the template piece.
 
Once printed on, your craft template needs to
be separated from the cardstock.
 
To do this, take a DRY HOT iron and run it
over your printed template. The glue will heat up
 and allow you to pull the bonded papers apart.  
 
(Do this while the paper is HOT) 
 
 
After you have pulled your freezer paper template
away from the cardstock, you can iron it to your fabric.
Place your craft template shiny side down on
to your fabric. With a HOT DRY iron
go back and forth over the freezer paper,
the craft template will stick to your fabric and
allow you to cut it out with precision.
 
  
Remember, freezer paper craft templates
are reusable. 
 
3. IRON ON TRANSFERS
By now you know how to trace and cut out the
freezer paper in to 8 1/2"x11" sheets.
 
What is different with this technique is
that you will use a glue stick
to glue the freezer paper, dull side down to a sheet of cardstock.
 
Yup, for the iron on transfer technique,
the shiny side will be facing UP!
 
You now have ready-to-use iron on transfer sheets!
It's that easy
 
Once you print on to the transfer sheet, be careful.
The ink is sitting on top of the shiny slick
surface of the freezer paper and is wet.
Handle with care!
 
You will need to work pretty quick. You don't want
to risk either smudging your wet transfer or
having it air dry.
 
 
Place your transfer wet side down on to your fabric.
 
I use a HOT DRY iron (where have we heard this before)
to transfer the image.
The iron will allow for the most available ink
 to transfer to your fabric.
 
 
DO NOT run your iron in a back and forth motion,
but rather press down, lift, and move your iron to
another spot and repeat until you are satisfied
with the image quality.
 
 
Freezer paper iron on transfers are for
when you want a slightly lighter more distressed
fabric transfer effect.
 
There you have it!
 
3 crafty ways to use freezer paper for-
 
  1. FABRIC TRANSFERS
 
2. CRAFT TEMPLATES
 
     3. IRON-ON TRANSFERS

I hope you'll try one or more freezer paper techniques
and let me know what you think!

Come back soon-

Pam

Fabric Yo Yo's Should Come With A WARNING LABEL

Making fabric yo yo's can be much like eating a bag of potato chips...
 you can't stop at just one!
 
 
Trust me I tried... over 15 years ago! 
Today, the amount of EXTRA fabric yo yo's that I have made
and not needed for one project or another
fills an entire vintage trunk of mine!
 
 
I have to say yo yo's are the perfect
 take along craft for anyone, especially new moms.
I know, because that's exactly the phase
of life I was in when I first saw these beauties in a magazine.
 
While I was a busy mom raising my babies and running around
there were two things that I was sure to have with me at all times. 
I had a fully stocked diaper bag and a Ziploc bag
filled with fabric, needle, thread and a small pair of scissors!
 
I can say that after teaching many friends,
family and young girls in the neighborhood how to make yo-yo's,
they all agreed with me. Once you begin
it is hard to stop!
 
 
Thing was, I didn't know what the heck I was going to do with them all.
I had found pure joy in just making them- lots of them.
But, now what!?
 
Well, I found myself fearless, not afraid to fail or make a mistake.
 I simply left it to my imagination
and I have never looked back.


Here are some of my more creative endeavors-
 
 
A YO YO VALENTINE HEART PILLOW
 
 
 A YO YO STUFFED BUNNY
 

 
AN AMERICAN FLAG WALL HANGING
 
 
 AN AMERICANA TABLE CLOTH
 
  
A HALLOWEEN TABLE RUNNER
 
 

A CHILD'S COVERLET OR TABLE CLOTH
 
 
I hope you might be inspired the same way
 I was inspired the first time I saw something created
from gathered circles of fabric! 
 
And... just to be sure that you get bitten by the yo yo bug,
let me show you how to make one.
 
 
INSTRUCTIONS FOR FABRIC YO YO
 
SUPPLIES NEEDED:
 
Fabric
Sewing Needle
Thread
Scissors
Circle Template
Pencil/Pen
 
1. Gather your fabric choices together.
 
100% cotton quilting fabric works great
for yo yo's, but feel free to use what you like
there is no right or wrong choice!
 
 
2. You will need a circle shaped template piece.
 Trace the circle to the backside of the fabric
 and cut out with scissors.
 I use a 5" plastic template.
This will make approximately a 2 1/2" finished yo yo.
 
 
 **HINT**
 Keep in mind when choosing a template size
that your finished yo yo will be
approximately 1/2 the size of the template piece.
 
 
3. Thread and knot your sewing needle.
Sew a simple running stitch catching a scant
 folded 1/4" of the outside edge of the circle as you go.
     This gives a finished edge to your yo yo.
 
 
4. Every few stitches pull your needle through.
   You can see here how the turned 1/4" edge 
looks on the outer portion of your circle
with the running stitch going through it.
 
 
Your doing GREAT!
 
5. You will continue folding and sewing a running stitch
    all the way around your circle until you find yourself 
back to the point where you began your first stitch.
 
 
**Here's where the magic happens!**
 
6. Find your knotted end of the thread and hold.
             Take your other hand and hold the end of the thread
             where your sewing needle is...and PULL the threads.
 
 
TA-DA! You have a perfect gathered circle.
 
7. Take both ends of the thread that you pulled
and knot them together. This will secure
your gathered circle now a finished yo yo.
 
 
You will want to trim your thread and be sure to leave
a small opening in the center.
 Do not pull so tight
that you close the hole.
You want it there!
 
 
 CONGRATULATIONS!
You now possess the skills necessary
to make a yo yo!
Go....make one, make 100 and enjoy!
 
I think you will find that while potato chips may taste better,
making 100 or so yo yo's are better for your health!
 
Drop me a line,
 I would love to see what you
create with your fabric yo yo's.
 
 
 
Come back soon!
 
Pam